Selected Families and Individuals

Notes


Colonel Elijah Isaacks

From Moore Milestones Melaney Moore-Dodson's Ancestors
http://www.cdlr.tamu.edu/mmdhome/
melaney@acs.tamu.edu

Roster of Soldiers from North Carolina in the American Revolution with an appendix containing a collection of miscelaneous records, Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., 1967, p. 38: Pages 313 Isaacs, Elish, Col. N.C. Militia ..; wounded and taken pris. at Camden August 16, 1777; Col. N.C. Militia in 1780-1781------- p. 192, Militia: Col. Elijah Isaacs, No. 900 Salisbury Dist., NC----
Texas DAR Patriot Index: Isaacks, Elijah, born about 1730 in VA (probably Frederick Co.), died in GA or NC after 1790. Married about 1750. Service: Member of the North Carolina Line under General Bates, Wilkes Co.; Children: Samuel, b. 1759, married Mary Wallace; Members Audrey Parker Brooks, No. 562536.;

Following information received from Robert Allen Isaacks via mail on 6-10-97. alleni@ldd.net; Robert Allen Isaacs, 13299 Hillside Dr., Ste Genevieve, MO 63670
Elijah ISAACKS (320) Col.
General (1-11) Elijah (320) was named "2nd son" and executor of his father's will. He inherited land "computed at 200 acres" and its improvements on the "south side of the Great Road from Capt. Lindsay's to Ashby's Ferry".

Birthdate is an estimation. Death date based on Will dated 4 April 1799, proven 24 June 1799 in Pendleton District., SC. Witnesses to his will: Thomas Gibson, William Isaacs, Hayes Blair. Executors were James Blair and Samuel Isaacks; will names children. Elijah was the 3rd generation lsaacks in America. He was a colonel in the Rev War, captured at Gen. Gates defeat at Camden, SC Aug 16, 1780, sent to England and exchanged July 1781. His capture by the British is recorded in NC State Records. In May 1782 NC Legislatures nominated Col. Elijah Isaacks as a Brigadier General for District of Morgan. Sold land in 1784 in Wilkes Co, NC. Bought land in Franklin Co, GA in 1785. He was on the l790 census of Pendleton District, SC.

The Records of the Moravians in NC report several troublesome visits by the Wilkes militia as they marched through the area during the Revolutionary War. One incident is of special interest: Salem Diary, page 1787, 6 Jan 1782… "Wilkes militia arrived, under Col. Isaacks. Most of them camped at Petersbach overnight, and had to be supplied with provisions and forage. At first they were rather wild, and the Colonel made various threats, but when they were served in friendly fashion they calmed down. Some of them attended the gemeinstunde and were quiet and orderly." Page 1787, 7 Jan 1782… "The Wilkes militia marched on ....".
(The Moravian records are in German, of course, and the word "gemeinstunde" translates as a "quiet evening time of study or reflection ...".

Elijah Isaacks and his brother Elisha, both from Wilkes Co., NC were elected to the Senate and the House respectively of the NC State Assembly in the early 1780's. These were not the twins Elisha and Elijah. The twins were grandsons of this earlier Elijah.

Samuel J. Isaacks in "The lsaacks Clan in American and Texas" says Elijah appears to have been fairly intolerant of the "Tories", those colonists who remained loyal to the British crown during the Revolutionary War. Fairly often in the Senate journal he was recorded as voting "yea" on bills to confiscate property of British sympathizers while in the NC House of Commons, his brother Elisha voted "nea".

". Author S. J. lsaacks quotes a letter from a Col. Farming, living in Canada, who described himself as a "loyal British subject" and complains he had been forced to leave his birthplace of NC after he and other loyalists suffered incidents of mistreatment at the hands of Col. lsaacks and the militia. Citizens not opposed to the Continental cause were not mistreated.

In the "Revolutionary Army Accounts" manuscripts of the NC State Archives is recorded that Elijah Isaacs was granted the sum of 38 pounds 7 shillings 2 pence on 17 Jan 1782, but the purpose of the payment is not given.

There are 2 Isaacks (different spellings) families in NC on the list of 1790 surnames on census.

WIFE NOTES: Sarah?

From "The lsaacks Clan in American and Texas"
Sometime after 1754 Elijah moved to South Carolina, but before the
beginning of the Revolutionary War moved up to Wilkes County, North
Carolina. His brother, Elisha, settled in the same county, but as to
when or whether he went from South Carolina or Virginia, the record is
silent. During the greater portion of the Revolutionary War, Elijah was
a Colonel in the North Carolina militia. During the same period, Elisha
was a captain. Near the close of the war Col. Elijah was made a
Brigadier General, and Capt. Elisha was made a Colonel.

During the early 80's both Elijah and Elisha were members of the North
Carolina Assembly, Elijah in the Senate, and Elisha in the House of
Commons, both from Wilkes County. Evidently at that time North Carolina
permitted one to hold a military and Civil office at the same time, as
both the Senator and Representative were at that time officers of the
militia.

Both in civil and military life Col. Elijah appears more active than
Capt. Elisha. His name appears more frequently in the Senate Journal
than does his brother's in the House of Commons Journal. Elijah appears
to have been a bit more intolerant of the British than Elisha. On more
than one occasion, as shown by the Journals, he voted "Yea" in the
Senate on bills to confiscate the property of British sympathizers,
while in the House of Commons, Elisha voted "No" on the same bills.

In the North Carolina State Records, Vol. XXII, pages 211-213, we find a
letter written from Canada by one "Col. David Fanning" after the close
of the war, in which he describes himself as a loyal British subject. He
complains bitterly that "I was forced to leave the place of my nativity
(North Carolina)". He relates many incidents to show how during the war
the British loyalists were mistreated. One of these throws some light on
the aggressive character of Col. Elijah. "Col. Fanning" says: "Col.
Isaacs came down from the mountains with 300 men and formed a camp at
Cox's Mill in the settlement I had formerly ranged, in order to take me;
here he continued nearly three months during which time the following
proclamation was issued: "(Proclamation not copied, but was to the
general effect that citizens not opposing the Continental Government or
resisting the army would not be molested)." During Col. Isaacs' stay ***
he ravaged the whole settlement and burned and destroyed a number of
houses belonging to friends of the Government *** . Two Captains in each
county were appointed by Col. Isaacs to keep the friends of the
Government Down."

Reading between the lines we may see that in order to win the war it
became necessary to "keep the friends of the Government down." Evidently
after Col. Elijah's advent, "Col. Fanning" ranged in that community no
more.

At the Battle of Camden, South Carolina, on August 16, 1780, when Gates
was defeated, Col. Elijah was captured and made a prisoner of war. Among
others captured at the same time and imprisoned at San Augustine, were
Gen. Griffith Rutherford, Capt. Edward Rutledge, and Judge Hugh
Rutledge. They were released June 22, 1781. (North Carolina State
Records, Vol. XV, page 292).

Our limited research has not revealed anything about the wives (?) of
Elijah, or any of his children, except one son, Samuel. Records of
Wilkes County show Elijah Isaacs was married to Ann Robins, daughter of
Nat Robins, January 18, 1780. This may have been the Colonel. If so, it
was his second marriage, for, according to the records, his son, Samuel,
was born in 1754. This could have been Elijah's second marriage, or,
perhaps another son of his, or maybe the son of Capt. Elisha.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
(this part is from the Texas DAR & is about Samuel III (7))

Texas DAR Patriot Index: Isaacs/Isaacks, Samuel, b. 1759 in Frederick
Co., VA; died after September 5, 1844 in Lincoln Co., TN. Married Mary
Wallace (Wallis) 1774-1776. She was born in Virginia in 1754 and died in
Lincoln Co., TN in 1838. Service: Private, Indian Spy, Edgefield Co.,
SC;
Children:
1. Elijah, b. February 22, 1775, married Esther Donaho.
2. Elisha, born February 22, 1775
3. Elizabeth, married --- Brown
4. Mary (Polly), b. abut 1776, died 1840, married Jacob Van Zandt in
1812
5. Rebecca, born about 1778, married George Walton.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
(this is about Elijah (6))

Texas DAR Patriot Index:

Isaacks, Elijah, b. February 22, 1775 in South Carolina, died in Jasper
Co., TX on November 1, 1859. Married Esther Donehue in 1797. She was
born SC in 1780 in Jasper county, TX. Not in Patriot Index, Service,
none given, Children, none listed., Members, Mildred Page Head, No
35201.
#"The New Handbook of Texas" in 6 Volumes, Austin, The Texas State
Historical Association, 1996, Vol. III, page 876
ISAACKS, ELIJAH (1775-1859). Elijah Issacks, early East Texas settler
and delegate to the Convention of 1832, the son of Samuel and Mary
(Wallace) Isaacks, was born in South Carolina on February 22, 1775. He
married Esther (or Hester) Donaho in 1797. By 1809 he was living in Pike
County, Mississippi. After serving in the Mississippi Territorial
Militia during the War of 1812 he moved to Texas. Family tradition holds
that Isaacks arrived in Texas on January 10, 1822, although the illegal
nature of such an early migration led him to subsequently to declare the
date as 1830 before Mexican authorities. In any event he was one of the
earliest white settlers in Bevil's Settlement and later secured a tract
along Walnut Run. Isaacks served as a delegate from the Snow River
district in Tyler County to the Convention of 1832. At this convention,
in San Felipe de Austin, he served on two committees, one to study the
future of settlement east of the San Jancinto, and one to consider a
petition for establishing a state government separate from Coahuila (see
COAHUILA AND TEXAS). He was the father of ten children, a farmer, and a
blacksmith; he owned two slaves by 1850. His son Samuel Isaacks probably
arrived in Texas before him. He lived on land that is now part of Tyler
and Jasper counties before moving to Jasper, where he owned four town
lots. He died there after a fall on November 1, 1859.
BIBLIOGRAPHY: Madeline Martin, More Early southeast Texas Families
(Quanah, Texas; Nortex, 1978) Texas House of Representatives,
Biographical Directory of the Texas Conventions and Congresses,
1832-1845 (Austin: Book Exchange, 1941.) Robert Wooster

From, THE ISAACKS FAMILY IN AMERICA AND TEXAS, by Samuel Jackson
Isaacks, June 15, 1935.

Moses Austin, late in 1820, had secured a contract with the Spanish
Crown to introduce 300 American Colonists into Texas, a part of Mexico,
then a Spanish possession. Returning to Missouri to mobilize his
colonists, his health failed, and he died without being able to
accomplish his ambition, but realizing his condition, persuaded his son,
Stephen F., to enter into the undertaking. It was late in the following
year, and after Mexico had achieved her independence from Spain, that
Stephen F. Austin, who had in the meantime secured a ratification of his
father's Spanish Grant by the Mexican Government, entered Texas with his
settlers.

The story of the fertility of its soil, the mildness of its climate, and
the opportunity of acquiring many acres of land with the outlay of an
insignificant amount of money, had inoculated Elijah Isaacks and his two
older boys with the Texas fever. On January 10, 1822, he, with his
family, with the exception of Samuel, and possibly the oldest daughter,
crossed the Sabine River, and thus established the Isaacks Clan in
Texas. William, with his wife and child, was probably one of the party.
If not, he came about the same time. Samuel, who was then 17, evidently
impatient at the slow locomotion of ox teams, arrived sometime before,
but the exact date is not available. He became one of Austin's first
colony, or the "Old 300", while his father and brother William settled
in Bevil's Colony. There is a tradition among his descendants that he
came to Texas even before Austin came with his colonists, but with other
"Sooners" was "Drafted" by Austin to make up his three hundred.

Bevil's Grant embraced what afterwards became Jasper County. It was here
that Elijah decided to make his home. He settled on Walnut Creek about
ten miles east from the Neches River, and about five miles southwest
from where the town of Jasper is now located. His grant of a league of
land adjoins on the west the John Bevil grant.

That he entered actively into the civic affairs of the community is
evidenced by the fact that he was delegate from the Neches River
District to the Convention of 1832, held at San Felipe, beginning
October 1st. This Convention is denominated by John Henry Brown in his
History of Texas, as the "First Convention ever held in Texas, and
composed of delegates elected by the people of each district." There
were 56 delegates representing 16 districts, San Felipe, Brazoria,
Bastrop, Hidalgo, San Jacinto, Viesca, Fayette and Neches River, Sabine,
Teneha and Liberty.

Stephen F. Austin was President, elected over W. H. Wharton, 31 to 15,
and Francis W. Johnson was Secretary. The President appointed Elijah
Isaacks on two committees, one "to take into consideration the land
business to the East of the San Jacinto River," the other "to report on
the expediency of petitioning for a State government distinct from
Coahuila." The appointment of this committee was contested, but on a
roll call it carried by a vote of 36 to 12. Isaacks voted for the
appointment of the committee. Evidently, he was aligned with the Austin
faction and against Wharton. (Brown's History of Texas, Vol. 1, pages
197 to 201).

Elijah lived nearly 40 years in Jasper County, and died November 1,
1859, when he was a few months less than four score and five years old.
A fall that broke his shoulder, and not old age, was the cause of his
death. During the nearly two score years between the day he crossed the
Sabine and his death, he lived under the Mexican flag, the Lone Star of
the Republic of Texas, and for the last twelve years under the Stars and
Stripes that he had reverenced in South Carolina, Tennessee and
Mississippi. His life span covered two declarations of independence and
two revolutionary wars. Had he survived a few months longer, he would
have expired under the flag of the Confederacy. His wife, Esther,
preceded him in death some ten years, having passed away September 14,
1849.

But little is known of Esther's Family, except that some of the Donahos
came to Texas from South Carolina, and settled in the Neches River
country, probably following Elijah and Esther.

So far as is known, all of the Isaacks in Texas are descendants of some
one of Elijah's sons.

Individual FactsBirth abt 1730 VirginiaDeath 1799 (age 69) Pendelton Co, S.C.
Marriages/Children1. _____ RACHELChildren Samuel ISAACKS (1755 - 5 Sep 1845)
Rebecka ISAACKS ( - ) George ISAACKS ( - ) Abbee ISAACKS ( - )
Jinny ISAACKS ( - ) Winny ISAACKS ( - )Notes (Individual)
General: The Colonel appears in vol 2 , page 113 NSDAR Patriot Index
He served in the North Carolina Colonial Legislature where
consistently voted to harass and suppress those loyal to KingGeorge.
He was captured by the British during the Battle of Camden
(South Carolina) and was held prisoner on the Ship Sandwich
from 15 Nov 1780 until June 22,1781 when a prisoner exchange
was agreed upon. Just prior to the end of the war he was
nominated for Brigadier General for the Morgan District ofNorth Carolina.
He also served Surrey County, North Carolina Safety Committee
and on March 22,1778 was sworn in as Justice of The Peace forWilkes County.
After the war he moved to Franklin County, Georgia and in ca
1790 moved to Pendleton District South Carolina and remained
ther until his death in `1799.Will of Elijah Isaacs
Youngest son George to have negro boy Isaiah when he reaches
age 21. If he dies without issue negro goes to Jinny andWinny.
Daughters Rebecka Isaacs, Abbee, Jinny and yougest daughterWinney.
dated 4 April 1799 proved 24 June 1799
Witnesses: Thomas Gibson, William Isaacs, Hayes Blair
Executors: James Blair and Samuel IsaacsNotes (Family #1)Sources
1. North Carolina Records, Volume XXIII, pages 211 thru 213.
Volume XXIII, page 211- 213.
2. Alexander, Elliott and Willie. Pendleton District and
Anderson County , SC Wills, Estates, Inventories, Tax Returns
and Census Records. page 23 and 173-174.
3. Sara Sullivan Irvin. SOUTH CAROLINIANS IN THE REVOLUTION
WITH SERVICE RECORDS AND MISCELLANEOUS DATA. page 85.

Elija Isaacs Will 1799
In the name of God Amen.
I Elija Isaacs of Pendleton County
Being in perfect mind & memory but weak in body calling to mind that its apointed once for man to die do mak this my last will and Testament first of all. I Commit my soole to God that gave it and my body to the dust to be decently buriyed _________and as to my wordly Estate to be disposed of as follows.
Deed Book 15. Page 171 Oct. 17, 1771
Deed of Release- Elijah Isaac to Taliaferro Stribling, 438 pounds, 13 shillings, 4 pence Virginia money- 219- 1/3 acres part of 415 acres granted to Samuel Isaacs August 8, 1752 - corner Isaac Foster at road from Battle Town to Berry's Ferry, corner David Ashbu. (Battletown was an early nameforBerryville.)
First I leave to my youngest sun Giorge Isaacs a Negro boy called Isack and my sadle and a small sorrel mair. The Negro to be delivered to him when he becums twinty one years of age and if should die without ishu the Negro to left to Jenny and Winney. Secondly I leave to my daughter Rebecka Isaacs her bed and furniture and a hors worth one hundred dollars _________and the ballence of my Estate both rail and pershenel I leave to my youngest daughter Winney Isaacs and do apoint James Blair and Samuel Isaacs soole exacetors of this my last will and testement witness my hand this fourth day of April 1799.
Elijah Isaacs (seal)
Interlind before Sind
Sind and acknowledge in presents
Thomas Gibson
William Nance
Hayes Blair
Recorded in Will Book C, page 173
Recorded June 24, 1799

Possible spouse - Rachel or Sarah
Possible 2nd wife - Ann Robbins m. 18 Jan 1787


Samuel Isaacks Jr.

Samuel ISAACKS, JR
Northern Neck, VA Land Grants, H, 1751-1756, record a grant: "...to Samuel Isaac of the County of Frederick a certain tract 415.... survey thereof made by Mr. George Washington: from The Right Honourable Thomas Lord Fairfax Baron of Cameron in the Land of Great Britain called Scotland Proprietor of the Northern Neck of Virginia…. " Dated August 8, 1752.
There is no date of signing his will, witnessed by: (----) McKean, Jno. Champion, Thomas Hill and Stephen Sebastin, Jr. "2nd" son Elijah was named executor.
The will was proved Mar 4, 1760 in Frederick Co, VA with Foster J. Baylis as Elijah's security in a bond of 500 pounds. All Samuel's children were named in his will. Elijah named "2nd son".


Samuel Isaacks Sr.

Courtesy of Dr. Rodney Allen:

Possibly Soirle McKissocks McIsaacs born about 1665 near Airsaig, Scotland.
Soirle (Samuel Sr.) left for Wales between 1680 and 1690 to work in the blossoming fishing and slate Industries. Then settled in Fredericks Co. VA about 1725. (Doctor Rodney Allen)

The first authentic record of the Isaacks family in the United States is that early in the 18th century Samuel Isaacks came over from Wales and settled in Frederick County, Virginia. The exact date is not known, but it was some time about 1725; whether he was married or single at the time is another matter in doubt. Nor do we know the maiden name of his wife. That he emigrated from Wales is reasonably certain , although one authority, John A. Isaacks, of Shandon, California, whose age is now nearing the century mark, maintains that there is a tradition in the family that the immigrant was from Scotland, and that he was undoubtedly a Scotchman. There is some question about his nationality, but it is pretty generally agreed that he was either Scotch or Welsh. There is, however, a tradition in my immediate family, but with no other so far as known, that some three centuries ago a family of Jews, one of whom was our ancestor, lived in Wales and married a Christian woman, on account of which his family disowned him. Whereupon he renounced Judaism and added the "k" to his name to distinguish him from the Jews. Until a few years ago when I began delving into the history of the family, I accepted this tradition as true, but from facts gleaned in the investigations, I am inclined to believe that the immigrant Samuel was either Scotch or Welsh.

Until a few years ago I believed the name was essentially Jewish and originally spelled without the "k". Investigation, however, has convinced me that while not common, with the use of the "k" it's a Scotch name; also, it is not an uncommon name in Holland,. The Dutch, however spell it without the "c" - "Isaaks", and sometime without the final "s".

While discussing nationality as signified by names, I may observe that the name "Isaacks" is not limited to Gentiles. Some American Jews - probably European as well - use the "k". A notable instance of this is Abraham Isaacks, of Emden and Friesland, who came to New York early in the 18th century, and was naturalized in 1728. He was a merchant in New York City. He was active in the Congregation Shearith Israel. His eldest son, Jacob, moved to Newport, R.I., was a merchant and ship broker, and rendered distinguished service to the American cause in the Revolution. The first Timothy Dwight, President of Yale, married a Miss Isaacks.

It might also be observed, with reference to the spelling of the name, that not a few Isaacks have dropped the "k". Mainly because other people persist in so doing. Probably a majority of my friends, whom I have known and corresponded with for years, persist in addressing me as "Isaacs". In the Land Grant to Samuel Isaacks, issued and signed by Stephen F. Austin, a photostatic copy of which I have, the name throughout the instrument is spelled without the "k", but in the signature it is "Isaacks". In the North Carolina State Records, Col. Elijah and Capt. Elisha's names are spelled both with and without the "k".

While we have no positive record of how long Samuel Isaacks, the immigrant, lived in Frederick County, Virginia, he must have continued to reside there until his death, for we find his grandson Samuel was born in that county in 1754. There is no record of any children except two boys, Elijah and Elisha, nor do we have a record of the dates of their births or deaths. Of their lives, however, both the North Carolina and South Carolina Archives are rather replete with their doings, especially of Elijah in the North State.

From, THE ISAACKS FAMILY IN AMERICA AND TEXAS, by Samuel Jackson Isaacks, June 15, 1935

Scott Walters of Kountze, TX via e-mail states children named in his will. Also from will, two grandsons named John and Elisha, father unknown.
Notes and Sources 22 Apr 1997 from the database of Melanie Moore-Dodson

Following information received from Robert Allen Isaacks via mail on 6-10-97. alleni@ldd.net; Robert Allen Isaacs, 13299 Hillside Dr., Ste Genevieve, MO 63670
Notes and Sources 22 Apr 1997
FAMILY NOTES
HUSBAND NOTES: Samuel (immigrant) ISAACKS (1280)
General (1, 2,3,4) Samuel Isaacks the immigrant was probably born in Wales and immigrated to America about 1725 (some sources say 1695).

Samuel, (immigrant 1280), saying he was of Parish and County of Frederick, signed his will 4 Dec 1749, witnessed by John Madsin, Ralph Croft (of Crofts), and Bridget Madson (verbatim spelling) and it was proved Tuesday, 8 May 1750 in Frederick Co, VA. Executor was his son Samuel (640), called "Jr." in will, whose securities, Bartholomew Anderson and Thomas Colson were held in a bond of 2OO pounds "current money". His four children were named and shared equally in the estate. He gave his daughters' married names.

Estate inventory was returned to court Tuesday, 14 August 1750. Total value was 46 pounds 17 shillings 6 pence

Heirs include 2 grandsons John and Elisha lsaac (not identified as to father of each). Each grandson to receive a featherbed.

The following is only a source to be further investigated; absolutely no connection has been made with our Samuel Isaacks:

A Samuell (sic) Isaac was commander of "The Virginia Factor", a ship bound for Virginia, leaving London in May 1690. Aboard was Thomas Tranter (son of Thomas Tranter) who was apprenticed to Isaac by the Children's Hospital of London, which was a home for children, not necessarily a hospital as we know it.

Oct 10 1844 Lincoln County
Inventory of the personal property belonging to the estate of Samuel Isaacs deceased:
4 Beds and furniture, 6 chairs, 1 folding table, 1 cupboard, bench, a large chest, 1 candle stand, 1 shot gun, 1 man's saddle, 1 bridle, ?, 1 shovel, 2 pots, 3pots, pot hooks, 1 set of knives and forks, 1 set of tablespoons, 1 set of teaspoons, ?, 4 ploughs, 6 welding shoes, 1 hand saw, 2 drawing knives, 5 chisels, 1 broad axe, 1 carpenter's square, 2 scythes, 1 pair axles, 3 pails, 1 pot rack, 1 mash pan, 2 half bushels, 1 coffee mill, 2 yoke oxen, 90 head of hogs, 23 head sheep, 5 cows and calfs, 25 bushels wheat, 6 acres corn fodder, 4 head horses, 13 negroes ( Jim, Lucy, George, Samson, Cato, Joe, Jack, Bill, Willie,Sam, Joey, Jane, May)
Nov 4 1844 B H Adams
C Kelso Nov 4 1844
Recieved Nov. 18 1844

In 1725, Samuel Sr. Isaacks immigrated from Scotland or Wales and arrived
in Fredericks Co., Virginia. His wife is not known at this time.
Samuel saying he was of Parish and County of Frederick, signed his will
December 14,1749, witnessed by John Madsin, Ralph Croft (of Crofts), and
Bridget Madson (verbatim spelling) and it was proved Tuesday, May 8, 1750 in
Frederick CO., Virginia. Executor was his son Samuel (640), called " Jr." in will,
whose securities, Bartholomew Anderson and Thomas Colson were held in bond
of 200 pounds " current money". His four (4) children were named and shared
equally in the estate. He gave his daughters' married names. Estate inventory
was returned to court Tuesday, August 14, 1750. Total value was
46 pounds 17 shillings 6 pence. Heirs include 2 grandsons John and Elisha Isaac
( not identified as to father of each). Each grandson received a feather bed.


Elisha Isaacks

Elisha ISAACKS
Named in fathers will.

Fairfax and Jost Hite Land Surveys, Shenandoah River, 1734-1735 Frederick Co., VA:

Elisha Isaacs, 200 acres, surveyed 16 October 1734 [no survey No.].


Margaret Isaacks

Margaret ISAACKS
Named in her father's will, using her married name.


Mary Isaacks

Mary ISAACKS
Named in her father's will using her married name.


William Henry Purswell

1880 Census, Richards, Barbour County, AL:

Living with the McKinney Wood family:

Henry PURSWELL S Male 20 AL Farm Work

1900 Census, 12th Pct. Lawrenceville, Henry County, AL:

Purswell, H. William Head W M Feb 1841 59 M 18 AL AL AL Farmer
Purswell, F. Ella Wife W F May 1848 52 M 18 9 7 AL AL AL
Purswell, Mary Dau Jan 1883 17 S AL AL AL
Purswell, H. John Son Sept 1885 14 S AL AL AL
Purswell, Exey Dau W F Aug 1887 12 S AL AL AL
Purswell, Woody Son W M Dec 1891 8 S AL AL AL
Purswell, Samuel Son W M Aug 1894 5 S AL AL AL
Purswell, Carrie Dau W F Apr 1896 4 S AL AL AL
Purswell, Alice Dau W F Sept 1898 1 S AL AL AL
Note: Actually, William was born in 1859 and was 41 in this census. The census taker got it backwards. Also, notice how the middle initial is before the first name on everyone. Could it be the census taker was dislexic? Makes me wonder, Ella's age doesn't seem right either, probably born in 1852 and 48 years old. SLM
Something else...I have their marriage date as 18 Jan 1883, note that Mary's birthdate is listed as Jan 1883. One of these dates may be in error....or was it a shotgun wedding? :>) And where are Maude and Maxie in these censuses, they should be there unless they were from another marriage. They would not have been born before 1883 unless that is not the correct marriage date (which I'm starting to suspect). Needs more research.

1910 Census, Lawrenceville, Henry County, AL:

Purswell, W. Henry Head M W 51 Wid AL AL GA English Farm & Mill Farm & Mill
Purswell, Samuel Son M W 17 AL AL AL English Farm Laborer Home Farm
Purswell, Carrie Dau F W 15 AL AL AL English Farm Laborer Home Farm
Purswell, Mary A. Dau F W 12 AL AL AL English Farm Laborer Home Farm

1920 Census, 13-Pct, Henry County, AL:

Norton Harrison Head M W 41 M AL AL AL Farmer General Farm
Norton Exie Wife F W 32 M AL AL AL None
Norton Ted Son M W 10 S AL AL AL None
Norton Sam Son M W 8 S AL AL AL None
Norton Ella Francis Daughter F W 6 S AL AL AL None
Norton Susan? Daughter F W 2 3/12 S AL AL AL None
Purswell Henry father in law M W 60 Wd AL AL GA Laborer Home Farm
Houston Alina? Sister in law F W 21 M AL AL AL (illegible)
Houston Galliger? (illegible) Son M W (illegible) AL AL AL None


Ella F. Calhoun

1880 Census, Richards, Barbour County, AL:

Living with the McKinney Wood family:

Henry PURSWELL S Male 20 AL Farm Work

1900 Census, 12th Pct. Lawrenceville, Henry County, AL:

Purswell, H. William Head W M Feb 1841 59 M 18 AL AL AL Farmer
Purswell, F. Ella Wife W F May 1848 52 M 18 9 7 AL AL AL
Purswell, Mary Dau Jan 1883 17 S AL AL AL
Purswell, H. John Son Sept 1885 14 S AL AL AL
Purswell, Exey Dau W F Aug 1887 12 S AL AL AL
Purswell, Woody Son W M Dec 1891 8 S AL AL AL
Purswell, Samuel Son W M Aug 1894 5 S AL AL AL
Purswell, Carrie Dau W F Apr 1896 4 S AL AL AL
Purswell, Alice Dau W F Sept 1898 1 S AL AL AL
Note: Actually, William was born in 1859 and was 41 in this census. The census taker got it backwards. Also, notice how the middle initial is before the first name on everyone. Could it be the census taker was dislexic? Makes me wonder, Ella's age doesn't seem right either, probably born in 1852 and 48 years old. SLM
Something else...I have their marriage date as 18 Jan 1883, note that Mary's birthdate is listed as Jan 1883. One of these dates may be in error....or was it a shotgun wedding? :>) And where are Maude and Maxie in these censuses, they should be there unless they were from another marriage. They would not have been born before 1883 unless that is not the correct marriage date (which I'm starting to suspect). Needs more research.


Ephriam S. Wise

Occupation: Farmer
Note: 1849 - Patented Land in Barbour County near brother Ezekiel

1880 Census, Richards, Barbour County, AL:

Ephram S. WISE Self M Male W 81 NC Farmer NC NC
Martha A. WISE Wife M Female W 63 NC Keeping House NC NC
Francis A. WISE Dau S Female W 23 AL NC NC


Martha Ann Millican

1880 Census, Richards, Barbour County, AL:

Ephram S. WISE Self M Male W 81 NC Farmer NC NC
Martha A. WISE Wife M Female W 63 NC Keeping House NC NC
Francis A. WISE Dau S Female W 23 AL NC NC


Frances A. Wise

1880 Census, Richards, Barbour County, AL:

Ephram S. WISE Self M Male W 81 NC Farmer NC NC
Martha A. WISE Wife M Female W 63 NC Keeping House NC NC
Francis A. WISE Dau S Female W 23 AL NC NC